You Can Heal Your Life – Louise Hay


Book Summary

You Can Heal Your Life is an amazing book that really delivers on its title. The book was one of the first of its kind to bring affirmations to people in such an easy to use and understand way. The power of the mind-body connection is explained so well in the book and the affirmations for each body condition at the back of the book are pure gold. The most amazing section is where Louise shares how she used these techniques to cure herself of cancer. This book is a must have on every shelf. It is an invaluable reference and is the perfect compliment to a well-balanced approach to health and well-being.

You Can Heal Your Life, Louise Hay, 1984. Hay House. ISBN 13: 978-0937611012

Why I Read the Book

I first encountered the concept that different parts of the body are connected emotional states from my reflexologist in 2004. It was a revelation. When she told me about the different emotions that could be released when you activate each organ through the reflexes, everything within me zinged. There was a truth there that resonated with me.

Shortly afterwards I found You Can Heal Your Life in a second-hand bookstore. It popped off the shelf and I saw, as I flipped to the back, the list of body conditions, the mental patterns that created them, and the affirmation that works like a mental antidote to the poison of unhelpful thoughts. In addition, the book also covers, work, finances, and relationships as well and how you can improve every area of your life with a change in your thinking.

Yes! Just what I was looking for and exactly when I needed it.

What I got from it Personally – The Book in Action

I immediately put the book and its exercises and affirmations to work. I saw immediate results. I still use it regularly today and it is a textbook in my Reiki courses. By using affirmations, I can honestly say that my whole life has changed. I no longer see myself as a hapless victim of circumstance, but as a powerful component of my own health and well-being. I have stopped migraines in their tracks with a simple shift in thinking. I have eased 90% of my allergy and asthma symptoms. I have acknowledged that my thoughts powerfully affect my body as well as my life.

This book powerfully shifted my entire way of thinking about health. If a simple thought could shift a physical condition, then what else could it shift? Everything, as it turns out. There is really no upper limit on the good that comes from a shift in thoughts. One of the biggest benefits is that you end up thinking differently!

Even if you are not convinced about the whole mind-body connection (although where does your brain live, if not in your body?), thinking a better thought is absolutely a huge improvement in your quality of life. There is a big difference between hope and despair. With practice we can choose our thoughts to be hopeful and joyous.

With the help of this book, I am no longer a slave to my thinking. I learned to train my thoughts to ones that support me and I no longer give energy to thoughts that do not support me. It really has healed my life.

Related Concepts and Books

Dying To Be Me: My Journey from Cancer, to Near Death, to True Healing. Anita Moorjani. 2012. Hay House. ISBN-13: 978-1401937515

Mind Over Medicine: Scientific Proof That You Can Heal Yourself. Lissa Rankin, MD. 2013. Hay House. ISBN-13: 978-1401939984

Molecules of Emotion: The Science Behind Mind-Body Medicine. Candace Pert, Ph.D. 1999. Scribner. ISBN-13: 978-0684846347

Read this Book if…

You have a medical condition or disease.

You are financially strapped.

You want true love.

Heartfullness: Surrendering the mind to the wisdom of the heart 


In Buddhism, where the concept of mindfulness originated, the heart is considered the seat of the mind. 

The true mind, the wise voice within us, always resides in the heart. Our hearts contain unlimited compassion, wisdom, and Divine connection. 

In our western philosophy, the mind has normally been equated with the brain. I have nothing against brains. I, personally, have lots of them! 😉 It is just important to remember that the intellect’s true purpose is to serve the wisdom of the heart. Not the other way around. 

So if you live in North America, I recommend changing your meditation practice to heartfullness. 

Use the power, wisdom, courage, and compassion of the heart to lead you to stillness. Surrender your clever brain and let your heart lead the way. 

Brains only work if they are connected to a functioning heart. Let the heart lead and the brain follow. 

Rest in Peace


peace

Rest in peace is a blessing we say for our dearly departed, but I have begun to ponder its deeper meaning. I have weathered my share of grieving in the past few years and I will be on my way to another funeral for a family member in the next few days. We wish them peace. But I often wonder if we are really the ones in need of peace. Nothing brings you face to face with your mortality faster than a funeral. The person that has passed is on the other side, in the world of Spirit, so they have already got what we are yearning for, peace in the heart.

I often say to my students to take their own good advice they offer to another. So, as I stand here in my physical world, I reach toward a place of stillness within my own heart and mind. In the very centre, there is a deep and vast well of peace. It is spacious and expansive, nurturing and healing.

Death teaches us how to live. I think the sole goal of a successful life is to have a huge funeral with standing room only. In the end, it is not our accomplishments, titles, or possessions that matter, it is the number of hearts we have uplifted and lives we have touched. So today I choose to think a thought of peace and listen to the still voice of wisdom that lives in my heart.

Speeding Motorcycle


A funny thing happened on the way home from writing class

I witnessed a motorcyclist crash, get up, and run away from the scene. I found myself writing a witness statement for the police who later informed me that the man I had tried to help was running from the law, with several outstanding warrants. I’m a type that always looks to my life experiences to decode the symbology and the deeper meaning. The search for meaning in random events always gives me greater insight and clarity into the deeper mystery of my life.

So here I am in my role as a witness, a symbol that is also discussed in meditation. The observer, the witness. To witness your thoughts, or anything, is to be apart from the action rather than being a part of the action. In meditation, there is power in the role of the witness, because the witness is the aspect of the Divine within.

Motorcycles are powerful, potent symbols, recalling freedom, masculinity, and excitement. There is always something just a little bit dangerous and forbidden about a motorcycle. That is probably why they are so alluring. The relationship of the rider with the bike is also mythic in proportions. This is not just an object, this is a subject. This is something that someone loves. The bike and rider are one. When they are parted, there is something shattering in the experience. The separation of ‘the one’ into ‘the two’, leaves an indelible image in the mind.

The wildness and disorientation of the event caused the man to run in the opposite direction, away from his bike and his escape route. He was already trapped by his cage of fear. It is only a matter of time until the police catch him, as the determined, yet kind, officer assured me that they would. The rider was already caught before he was even found.

So what does this mean for me, a non-motorcycle driving, law-abiding woman? Maybe that the chaos I feel around me is not mine, I just happen to be in a good place to see it for what it is. To know that the wild dash in the opposite direction is a symptom of a deeper problem. To know that there is strength in my role of observer as I am removed from the action even though it appears as though it is happening to me. To know that my instincts are right, to be cautious when getting out of the car and cautious with injured people. To know that some injuries are hidden, locked away by years of trauma. The wild, wide-eyed, look is a sure sign of stress and trauma even in those who appear fine externally.

And to acknowledge that I do not do what other people do. I do not follow the crowd. I got out. I offered help. I stayed. I helped again. I was the only one. I was the only witness, of at least 8 to 10 people to stay at the scene until the police could arrive.

So perhaps, more than anything, I am proud of myself. I am proud of my instinct to help, even though it was an inconvenience. I am proud of my ability to keep a cool head, protect myself, and give instructions to others to call 911. I am proud that I could help the police, in a small way, do their job. I am proud that I stayed. I am proud that I was a friendly face in a sea of chaos.

I am different. That is good.